Kintsugi Kitchen

Discussion in 'Make It So' started by jacktrash, May 19, 2015.

  1. TheOwlet

    TheOwlet A feathered pillow filled with salt and science

    I was on vacation the last three days, some expensive spa deal, and y'all THE FOOD.

    I may have had some serious thoughts about kidnapping whoever's in charge of the baking. They had a lowcarb lemon cake that was incredible enough that i went for seconds. Sublime texture. Excellent lemony tasty.
     
    • Winner x 5
  2. Acey

    Acey time has the power to bind us too close

    If you ever get the chance to try garlic-stuffed green olives I highly recommend ‘em (assuming you like garlic ofc)!
     
    • Agree x 1
  3. bornofthesea670

    bornofthesea670 Well-Known Member

    Garlic are very good, I would have probably gotten them if the store had any. They had blue cheese stuffed, and while I like both blue cheese and olives, im not greatly fond of them at the same time. I'm having a similar problem with the salmon actually, the taste is alright but the fish has been made into a paste which is not my favorite olive-stuffing-texture.

    If I could buy regular pickled garlic cloves I would. Garlic good, pickling brine good.
     
    • Like x 1
    • Agree x 1
  4. hyrax

    hyrax we'll ride 'till the planets collide

    i loooooooove anchovy stuffed olives! never seen salmon or sardine, but the anchovy ones are just this pop of super salty super condensed umami flavor-- they kind of remind me of like a blue cheese stuffed olive, just More So. delicious. though i can definitely see them not being everyone's bag but that's fine more for me

    eta just saw the blue cheese comment lol, fair enough!
     
    Last edited: Aug 20, 2021
    • Like x 1
  5. bornofthesea670

    bornofthesea670 Well-Known Member

    @hyrax I may have called them by the wrong fish, it was probably anchovy. I think I would use the paste in a sauce or something, but fish paste on its own is...not for me

    Tho I did finish the whole can of olives. I'm not one to waste olives. The savory oily flavor made my wine taste sweeter! And since it wasnt one of my favorite brands that was a good thing. I don't often want wine but when I do, sweeter the better.
     
    • Like x 2
  6. PotteryWalrus

    PotteryWalrus halfway hideous and halfway sweet

    I wrote down my recipe for tuna melt casserole here for my gf, and I figured you guys might appreciate it as well.

    It's high-carb, cheesy, tasty, and if you like tuna, an excellent dish for cold weather or sick days. It'll definitely put hair on your chest and stick to your ribs, but sometimes that's what you need.
     
    • Winner x 2
    • Useful x 2
  7. devils-avocado

    devils-avocado tired and gay

    oh dang, hot cheese and tuna, such a winner

    I had a brand name tuna cookbook as a kid that got me into making tuna pot pie, which iirc is delicious hot and also delicious as a cold lunch
    1 batch of pie dough that will make both crust and lid
    1 can cream of mushroom soup (can sub bechamel or other creamy sauce, I do that nowadays bc canned mushrooms have a Texture)
    1 can tuna
    I forget what the original book said to do for vegetables, but I use at least a cup of frozen mixed veggies, plus extra corn, and a boiled diced potato
    also I put cheddar cheese in it

    stir the tuna and veggies into the heated sauce, season to taste, put it in the pie crust with some cheese between the filling and the top crust, poke some steam vents in the top crust, and bake at 425f for the first fifteen minutes, then at 350f until the crust is browned and the filling is bubbly
    last fall I was making a lot of (usually) one-pot tuna pasta, by boiling the pasta first, making a cup or so of cheese sauce in the pot after that, adding half a can of tuna and mixed vegs and corn, and then eating it with hot sauce and more shredded cheese on top. hmmmm... I should get some tuna
     
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2021
    • Winner x 2
  8. vuatson

    vuatson [delurks]

    Hen of the woods :)

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    • Winner x 11
  9. vuatson

    vuatson [delurks]

    hey guys does anyone know wtf sweet pickled pumpkin is used for. I got some for christmas last year and just opened it and I have zero idea what to use it for. it's pretty sweet, very very vinegary, with a hint of clove. apparently it's a german thing? is it used as a side dish? in stews? I want to at least try to figure out how to use it before giving up and throwing it out
     
  10. TheOwlet

    TheOwlet A feathered pillow filled with salt and science


    Yeah a side dish like how you'd eat a dill pickle! Reckon it might be nicely with just some butter on a dark rye bread or some such. If you don't like the taste as is, you could probably use it as a relish base, add some onions and such?
     
    • Informative x 1
  11. vuatson

    vuatson [delurks]

    I don't eat rye bread that much but I'll give it a shot! it sounds pretty good :)
     
    • Like x 1
  12. TheOwlet

    TheOwlet A feathered pillow filled with salt and science

    I'm the horrible gremlin who will make a dinner out of a glass of pearl onions and some buttered bread, so it was the first thing that came to mind, i'll admit ;P
     
    • Like x 1
    • Agree x 1
    • Winner x 1
  13. vuatson

    vuatson [delurks]

    to me, rye bread = "toast, butter, mustard, swiss cheese and maybe ham" and nothing else lol. I have not explored the world of rye bread. I will start by making that exact sandwich except also with some pickled pumpkin I guess
     
  14. vuatson

    vuatson [delurks]

    does anyone know a good beef stew recipe? I've never made it before, but I have some stew beef and need a week's worth of leftovers. most of the recipes I get on a cursory google look to come out with a soup rather than a proper thick stew.
     
  15. devils-avocado

    devils-avocado tired and gay

    red wine, mushrooms, thyme, grainy mustard and some tomato paste is nice with beef... I don't often cook with it, but if I had some, searing it in one-inch cubes and then frying onions and mushrooms in the same pan, deglazing with wine and/or beef stock, and slow cooking it (with or without potatoes/carrots/barley, depending on how much stew you need for the week and how much beef you're starting with) would be my choice. the potatoes or barley would also contribute some thickening, just by being cooked into the recipe
     
    • Agree x 2
    • Useful x 1
  16. slithery dee

    slithery dee came out of the sea

    things you can thicken a stew with: flour, corn starch, instant mash potato flakes if you can stand the taste/texture, or you can make dumplings in the broth if you like dumplings

    for flour: melt some butter in a fry pan, spoon your flour in (depending on your amount of stew broth, I'd say around 2-4 heaped spoons of the flour). stir the flour around until it's fried to brown crumbles, then ladle some of your broth in with the crumbles. stir!! thoroughly!!! when it's smooth and mixed, ladle more broth in and stir!! thoroughly!!! again. once that's done, dump the whole contents into you pot of stew, and stir around till it's mixed in.

    corn starch is a bit less effort, at least the way I do it: melt some spoonfuls of butter in a bowl in the microwave, dump a big ol spoonful of the corn starch in the butter liquid, stir IMMEDIATELY AND THOROUGHLY. once it's smooth and pale yellowish, ladle a spoonful of your broth in the bowl too. STIR IMMEDIATELY. after THAT'S smooth, ladle one more helping of the broth in, repeat. then dump it all into your stew pot, STIR IMMEDIATELY AND THOROUGHLY. repeat with another bowl of butter/corn starch roux if the broth is not to your desired thickness, but beware the fact that too much corn starch can leave a raw taste in your stew that can take a while to simmer out.

    dumplings are even less effort, if you go the lazy route like I usually do and just buy a decent-quality biscuit dough and cut it up into dumpling chunks. just drop them into your pot nearish to the end of your cooking time; in cooking, they thicken up the broth all by themselves!
     
    • Useful x 2
  17. vuatson

    vuatson [delurks]

    thank you guys! however I ended up doing something completely different lol - I made a moroccan beef stew based on these two recipes. it came out really well :D

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    I added a whole lot of sweet peppers that neither of the recipes called for, and next time I might use some winter squash or sweet potato as well as/instead of the carrots. definitely going to make this again!
     
    • Winner x 3
    • Like x 2
  18. devils-avocado

    devils-avocado tired and gay

    ooooh that's a good idea, I'm intrigued by the combo of beef and chickpeas :swoon:
     
  19. vuatson

    vuatson [delurks]

    it works really well! the chickpeas end up disintegrating a bit and help with thickening the stew alongside the flour dredging for the beef. definitely recommend the extra veg, the peppers really work well (especially since I left out the celery). and I used a half cup each of raisins and chopped apricot plus all the spices from both recipes.
     
    • Like x 1
  20. PotteryWalrus

    PotteryWalrus halfway hideous and halfway sweet

    Oh god it's really hit stew weather and I really want beef stew now but we're getting our kitchen renovated so no stove atm

    Am sad because all sounds so tasty :(
     
    • Witnessed x 6
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