Regional variation in words

Discussion in 'General Chatter' started by seebs, May 21, 2015.

  1. Aondeug

    Aondeug Cringe Annoying Ass Female Lobster

    People actually have names for that thing? Like I knew they had to but it is just kind of weird to hear them after years of...not having a word for that thing. It's the thing in the car.
     
    • Like x 1
  2. Chiomi

    Chiomi Master of Disaster

    We call it the 'oh shit' bar.

    And we had 'come to Jesus' talks at my Wisconsin United Methodist youth group, which were mostly about playing nice with others but contained an undercurrent of irony because the youth pastor who was in charge knew that most of us weren't Christian.
     
  3. Morven

    Morven In darkness be the sound and light

    That was just "grab handle" to me growing up (UK)
     
  4. Starcrossedsky

    Starcrossedsky Burn and Refine

    We call it the suicide handle around here. I have no idea why.
     
  5. jpronghorn

    jpronghorn Member

    A "come to jesus moment" is the moment you realize you must come to grips with a reality you have been avoiding. It has been around for a long time. See, for example, the movie The Russia House: " It's come-to-Jesus time for both sides now, the hawks and the doves."
     
    • Like x 2
  6. Izevel

    Izevel capuchin hacker fucker

    Marine layer! That's my favourite weather. I miss it, now that I live in England.
     
  7. seebs

    seebs Benevolent Dictator

    Call lunch dinner dinner supper tupperware in the cupboard.
     
    • Like x 2
  8. Emma

    Emma Your resident resident

    If you're now living in England, and I understand the term correctly, I would think you'd have loads of this weather?
     
  9. Izevel

    Izevel capuchin hacker fucker

    Meh. In the Bay Area it was almost every day.
     
  10. IndigoRiffRaff

    IndigoRiffRaff FACE GOD AND WALK BACKWARDS INTO HELL

    *digs up old thread*
    So apparently my region (Eastern Oregon, plus some of the surrounding bits of Washington and Idaho) is weird because we use "rig" to mean any vehicle with four wheels that was designed to be highway-legal (so, excluding tractors and ATVs and stuff) and carry two or more people - any flavor of car, SUV, pickup, etc. But not buses, those are too big and carry too many people to be a rig. Every time I say "rig" to people who aren't from around here, they get very confused. It's such a good and useful word though!
     
    • Like x 3
  11. winterykite

    winterykite Non-newtonian genderfluid

    Did I ever mention the wonderful mess of words and things they refer to the cluster of 'Berliner', 'Pfannkuchen', and 'Crepes' is?

    Where I grew up, 'Berliner ' is a type of sweet pastry filled with jam and covered with powdered sugar. It also refers to citizens of the city Berlin.
    Now, in Berlin those pastries are called 'Pfannkuchen', which, where I come from, refers to either an either sweet or savory dish made of eggs, milk (or water), and flour, and fried in a pan, thus 'Pfannkuchen' - pancake. Now the stuff I think of as 'Pfannkuchen' gets called 'Crepes' just about... everywhere else, nevermind that 'Crepes' are almost always sweet.
     
    • Like x 4
  12. Mercury

    Mercury 17 Quicksilver Scribe Tramples The Unrepentant

    Fellow (former) Eastern Oregonian here, can confirm. Despite a lot of my terms having changed from living on the other side of the planet for over a decade, I still call most personal vehicles rigs (and sometimes get some very puzzled looks).
     
    • Like x 1
  13. Everett

    Everett local rats so small, so tiny

    I'm from Ontario and a couple former coworkers from Manitoba were talking about how weird it is that here, when the teacher goes over the answers to the test/homework with the whole class, we call that "taking up" the homework/test/worksheet whatever. Like, let's take up yesterday's homework, who wants to start? and then you give the answer to show you actually did the work. I've actually forgotten what exactly Manitobans call that, maybe it was just "go over".
     
  14. Re Allyssa

    Re Allyssa Sylph of Heart

    wrt 'rig' I only think of like 18 wheelers as rigs. Not personal vehicles. xD Mostly from Florida, for reference
     
    • Like x 3
  15. Loq

    Loq AND ANOTHER THING (ABOUT PIGEONS)--

    "Rig" as a general vehicle doesn't seem to be a thing I my area (southeastern Pennsylvania), but oddly enough we have "big rig" for those big shipping trucks with 18-20something wheels
     
  16. winterykite

    winterykite Non-newtonian genderfluid

    (it seems like i talked about the pfannkuchen stuff back on page 1, whoops, sorry about that .._..")

    Another interesting thing, this time rooted in the dialect of my hometown -- words of movement. Gehen, laufen, rennen, etc.
    So, "gehen" is "to walk". "Rennen" is "to run". "Laufen" is context dependent and can mean either, being able to walk is "laufen k├Ânnen", but usually the best translation for "laufen" would be "to jog". "Rennen" isn't usually used, except if speed is of the essence. In the context of marathons, "laufen" is used.
    Now my hometown sees that a little differently. We don't use "gehen" for walking, we use "laufen". And when the rest of Germany uses "laufen", we use "rennen" instead.
    Same with words used for jumping.
     
    • Like x 2
  17. PotteryWalrus

    PotteryWalrus halfway hideous and halfway sweet

    So here's one from the north of england - what do americans and aussies and other people call their ginnels?

    (A sort of little alleyway between houses - I believe in bygone years it was used to keep whatever smallholding livestock the house might possess, but mostly nowadays it's just bikes, garden equipment, and the occasional homeless person, depending on your area.)
     
    • Like x 2
  18. Re Allyssa

    Re Allyssa Sylph of Heart

    I don't have a word for that besides alleyway.... Maybe side yard? If there's grass there.
     
    • Like x 1
  19. Everett

    Everett local rats so small, so tiny

    Re: ginnels, I'm Canadian and at least where I grew up (city between Ottawa and Toronto) I never encountered a word for it. If I wanted to refer to that area I might say, like, beside the house, or along the side of the house I guess? Neat word, though.
     
    • Like x 2
  20. peripheral

    peripheral Kinky Digamma

    In French it's called a rouelle.
    I guess public alley?
     
    • Like x 1
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