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The Research Accessibility Aid Is: IN!!!

Discussion in 'General Advice' started by cosmofex, May 1, 2018.

  1. jacktrash

    jacktrash spherical sockbox

    ooh i've got this

    http://www.akimbocomics.com/?p=924

    i love this comic a lot, not least because seebs says the black shirt goblin looks like me :D
     
    • Like x 1
  2. aetherGeologist

    aetherGeologist Well-Known Member

    Please can you help me find a naming resource for an Indian character born in approximately 1865 - 1870? Ideally this would be broken down by region/religion/caste but my main worry is cballing him something anachronistic.
     
  3. cosmofex

    cosmofex trans lesbian extraordinaire

    I've got two things for you! They're both searchable records of births, deaths, baptisms, marriages, and so on from India, covering the British occupation (1857-1947). Coverage of deaths also means it covers a goodly bit of birth names from before that time span too. Neither are separated by nationality, so there's a lot of British people in there too, but you can look up the names you like to find out more details about the region, religion, and caste associated with the name.
    1. This one has records from the old British India Office, and has the area the person was born, sometimes down to the town, and often with a last name too.
    2. I'm pretty sure this one uses the same set of records, but it's got a different layout and search engine, so it may give different results.
    I hope this helps!
     
    • Like x 3
  4. aetherGeologist

    aetherGeologist Well-Known Member

    Thanks, that’s exactly the kind of resource I needed!
     
    • Winner x 1
  5. cosmofex

    cosmofex trans lesbian extraordinaire

    .......... i have one for my own thread :confutoot: Ok so I know @jumpingjacktrash lurks here now, and the rest of your nakama is on kintsugi so i recon between the lot of you the answers would be fairly easy to get. I desire info on life in Minnesota but I don't know where to look for reviews on actual life there that are more than "its cold as balls come winter" that an actual Minnesotan would agree with. Me and my moirail are thinking of moving in that direction, but neither of us have been there personally, and it's not a famous enough location to have heard about specific areas through cultural osmosis.

    We want to know
    1. what is the weather like, other than "cold as balls, hits the negatives daily"?
    2. what is public transit like, if there is any?
    3. what would be a reasonable expectation for buying 4-5 acres, or building a house?
    4. what's the cost of living?
    5. what price gas hang around at?
    6. what are the politics like, and how well the attitude of peeps match up to them?
    7. if we did buy land, how far would we end up being from urban areas?
    8. are there any areas that don't match up with the general state?
    and last but not least,
    1. if we DID take all this information and move up there, how stoked would you be for some locally sourced angora wool?
     
  6. jacktrash

    jacktrash spherical sockbox

    1. actually p nice most of the time, it just hits extremes at the height of summer and winter.
    2. bus service is decent in metro area, shitty in suburbs; only the one light rail line, but it goes zoom and i love it
    3. spendy! but worth looking at in rural areas
    4. quite reasonable
    5. someone else answer this as i have not been the one to fill the tank in several months and don't remember what it cost then
    6. very progressive in urban areas and college towns like northfield. more conservative in rural areas, those tend to skew republican, but still p big on labor and environment even where racist/homophobic/theocratic types get the votes.
    7. i've seen some pretty reasonable farmland for sale near here, and we're an hour out. farther you get from the tc, the cheaper it'll be, tho
    8. iron range can be real conservative, and also poorer and less well managed than the norm; some areas just south of duluth feel more like detroit than mpls, don't live there.
    9. SO STOKED OMG
     
    • Informative x 2
  7. cosmofex

    cosmofex trans lesbian extraordinaire

    sweet! thats pretty much exactly what i needed, just enough to get a good idea of the place
     
    • Like x 1
  8. NevermorePoe

    NevermorePoe Nevermore

    Gas tends to hang out around $2.00 at least it was last time i checked here.
     
    • Like x 1
  9. cosmofex

    cosmofex trans lesbian extraordinaire

    noice! here in central ky the gas is ~$2.20, and in the past month or so its been like, $1.95
     
  10. jacktrash

    jacktrash spherical sockbox

    hey @cosmofex can you help me out with some google fu? i've tried every combination of bridge, construction, supports, pillars, ocean, bay, and underwater i can think of, and am not turning up any useful image results whatsoever that will tell me what big ocean-crossing bridges look like underwater.

    i don't need diagrams of a caisson, mind. i don't need to know how they get the materials onto the ocean floor. i need to know what shape it is, how it interfaces with the floor, how much wider it is at the bottom, that kind of thing. whether there's big differences between more supports and fewer supports, for instance, in what shape they end up. ideally, some ideas about silt build up and marine growth on them over time, and how the materials degrade, would be great too, but i'd be happy with just a couple of gloomy underwater photos if they'd show the right part of the seafloor.
     
  11. cosmofex

    cosmofex trans lesbian extraordinaire

    Heyo!

    here is a cross-section of how the caisson is attached to the seabed, and heres a close-up version with labels. basically, big concrete, stone, or metal piles are sunk deep in the sea bed in a grid pattern to reach a non-compressible layer. then rock and rubble is poured on/dug out to match the height of the piles, and the actual structure of the bridge rests on top of that foundation.

    i found a good wikipedia list of cross-sea traffic structures and read through a bunch of the bridge articles. turns out that the biggest cause of bridge failure is called scour, where turbulence caused by the bridge support interrupting the current literally scours the bed down-current of the support until the bridge isn't resting on anything at all on one side, and the other side has a silt dune built up that pushes it onto the unsupported side. the degree to which this matters entirely depends on where you put this, how strong the currents are, how deep the piles are, and so on. sea bridges don't seem to have much of a problem with this, but that may just be because sea bridges as a concept haven't been around for very long at all, really.

    the shape of the caisson overwhelmingly favors rounded shapes specifically to reduce the effects of scour, so ovals, circles, and very rounded rectangles are the norm, depending on how big the foundation needs to be. for a single pillar it'd be a circle, for two pillars or one very wide pillar it'd be an oval, and for four pillars or two very wide pillars it'd be a rectangle. the base is always wider than the structure, somewhere between half-again and twice as wide, depending on how deep the base is. taller structures require wider bases, but so long as the caisson is deep enough it doesn't really get bigger than three times as wide as the above-water pillar, even for really stupid-tall suspension bridges.

    as for how many pillars are being used, that depends on how long the bridge is. past a certain point (discussed in this reddit thread) you have to take the curvature of the earth into account, which basically means that past a point single-span suspension bridges become impractical. single-span trusses and other self-supporting bridge types are too flexible over these distances too, so pillars are going to be pretty frequent. the most common way of making a sea bridge is called a continuous span, which is where dozens upon dozens of short spans are made. for beam or girder bridges, this means a pillar every 80 meters or less, usually a lot less to lessen stress on the beam. truss, suspension, and cantilever spans are used over sections that need more space between pillars.

    you'll be happy to know that continuous span sea bridges are ideal artificial reefs! even though most of them are less than a century old, many of them already have reef or kelp forest growth happening all across their length.

    one idea for further research is looking up youtube videos of scuba diver bridge inspections, bridge dives, and so on for specific bridges. i find that generally speaking, looking up specific places gets you better info on all the related places than looking up generic types of places.
     
    • Informative x 3
    • Like x 1
  12. jacktrash

    jacktrash spherical sockbox

    thank you so much! that was pretty much everything i needed. i'd have loved some photos of pilings underwater but you're right that scuba videos are probably my best bet. i don't suppose you know of any specific stone arch or beam bridges that cross ocean bays or inlets? what i'm thinking about is pre suspension bridge tech or rebar, though roman style sea concrete isn't out of the question.
     
  13. cosmofex

    cosmofex trans lesbian extraordinaire

    while the only one i can name without looking up is the one across Chesapeake Bay, i have a couple of links that will help! this is a list of cross-sea bridges, and this is a list of longest bridges. the cross-sea bridges are bridges over full-out ocean, and if you set the list to order by length, the first three dozen or so are all across bays and inlets!

    interestingly, if you set the list to order by date completed, you can see that there's only 5 bridges ever constructed before 1 century ago that are longer than 3km long, and of those only one was built before 1880. it isn't even a bridge in the way most people think of them, its just a 2 mile long dirt mound through a swampy floodplain with a stone road on top!
     
  14. jacktrash

    jacktrash spherical sockbox

    the one i'm figuring out for my writeys is not actually very long or high, it's just extremely massive and the inlet is super deep. i'm trying to figure out what kind of architectural and magical and archaeological bullshit i can fit into the pillars, and what kind of shape it's going to be in after however long, and so forth. so when there's a thousand-year flood and the bridge deck breaks, and gareth and casimir seal their treaty by building a better bridge upstream instead of fixing it... well, there's Shenanigans with the old bridge, but i'm not entirely sure on details about what i want to do with it, and i need to have it in my head to play with. if that makes any sense.

    i figure i can handwave some technological elements because of magic, but i still want it to feel pretty ancient and monumental. so there won't be steel and if there's poured concrete it's roman style.

    maybe i should look into that one big ass statue they built in a bay once upon a time and it was a Wonder Of The World until it fell down? i don't remember the name tho.
     
  15. NevermorePoe

    NevermorePoe Nevermore

    Collossus of Rhodes?
     
    • Agree x 1
    • Winner x 1
  16. jacktrash

    jacktrash spherical sockbox

    that's the bunny. unfortunately, it turns out they're not even sure where it was, wrt the bay, so there's no information on how its base handled the water.
     
    • Witnessed x 1
  17. jacktrash

    jacktrash spherical sockbox

    simple question, my google-fu just failed me for some reason: what does cloth-of-gold weigh?

    specifically, a large garment like a coronation robe, sized for an adult man. ballpark number.

    also i've heard you can't wash it, which is like... doesn't it get... super stinky? like an ecclesiastical stole or coronation robe that's worn on ceremonial occasions, isn't your priest or king sweating in it through the ceremony, and these are passed down to the next one and the next, for a hundred years or whatever... you'd think it'd be just super disgusting after a while. this isn't as important because there's cleaning spells in stalemate verse, but like. yuck.
     
  18. Codeless

    Codeless Cheshire Cat

    So a v general answer wrt stinky:
    Generally people wore Lots of layer for that exact reason. The inner layers soak up the yeugh and are washable and replacable. Think outside coat more than sweater for the garments function.

    ETA: As in a coat worn to go outside

    You can still see this in lolita fashion where the prints can be cery delicate and peoole wash dresses as rarely as possible. Lots of inner layers.
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2019
    • Agree x 2
  19. LadyNighteyes

    LadyNighteyes Wicked Witch of the Radiant Historia Fandom

    Cloth of gold is made from thread with gold foil wrapped around it, right? I'd assume it's hard to wash because if you soak it the thread may not dry. If so, you might be able to clean it gently even without magic, just so long as you don't get it wet all the way through.
     
  20. jacktrash

    jacktrash spherical sockbox

    ah, that makes sense. yeah, my winter coat is washable (army surplus, think it's all cotton) but i've only actually washed it once, when i slipped in mud and put my arm down in river water. otherwise it doesn't get dirty.

    tempting as it is to manufacture an excuse for gaz to fall in the river wearing his kinging robes, he's not a damn idiot. :P

    anyhow, thanks for that item of information, because i would've had him just wearing a silk shirt and linen undershirt under it and nothing else between his armpits and the gold fabric. piling on a few more layers will make him sweat like a hog -- no, this is gaz, he'll use a cooling spell and make everyone jealous -- but at least he won't have to smell his dead dad's stonk on the robe of office.

    he's still going to have an argument with the minister of protocol about having to wear the robe at all, tho, and his primary argument is "gold is heavy waaah" so i still gotta find the weight. that one indian guy who had a cloth of gold shirt made, the article said it weighed 3kg, which is about six and a half pounds, and that's just for a short sleeved shirt. and i'm talking about like... this.

    [​IMG]

    edit: in related news, pinterest can suck my dick. why is it always half the search results and why does it never give source and why can't i wad it up and stuff it in the recycling bin with the moldy potatoes.
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2019
    • Witnessed x 3
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